©2018 The Art | Crime Archive. All Rights Reserved.

Terms of Use | PrivacyComments Policy

American Horror Story

March 9, 2017

 

American Horror Story has become an award-winning TV show whose seasons take on some very controversial topics. These include serial killers, slavery, and the objectification of the disabled. Starting all the way in season 1 called "Murder House" we see the Black Dahlia and the Richard Speck massacre are artfully remade. The second season, "Asylum" continues a rhetoric of mental disabilities among the characters in AHS and even features a woman claiming to be Anne Frank. The third season, "Coven" is extremely disturbing in its depiction of Madame Delphine LaLaurie, who tortured her slaves both in real life and in the show. In all fairness, this show does seem to address the racial issues brought about through LaLaurie's depiction. The show is divided in the magic of the racially white witches and the black voodons. This season does involve another famous serial killer known as the Axeman of New Orleans. The next season, "Freak Show" highlights the use of disabled persons as objects to be gawked at and made fun of. The famous serial killer shown in this season is none other than John Wayne Gacy who raped and killed at least 33 men. The following season, "Hotel" depicts America's first serial killer, H.H. Holmes as one of its characters as well as Aileen Wuornos, Nightstalker, and Jeffrey Dahmer. In the most recent season, "Roanoke", the "Lethal Lovers, Catherine May Wood and Gwendolyn Gail Graham. The themes of these shows are based on real events, which does add to the fear factor of the show the same way "based on a true story" add terror to horror films. However, the serial killers in this show are displayed as either horrific or relatable. It humanizes the killers while their victims are often ignored (except in the case of Black Dahlia). It also capitalizes on both physical and mental disabilities that the characters have in every season. While horror is a genre that even I enjoy does the use of real people within the story capitalize on human suffering?

Please reload

RELATED ARTICLES

Please reload